Results for tag: China

Member Spotlight: Robert Cliver

Robert Cliver is Professor of History at Humboldt State University (California) and has been a member of AAS for almost 16 years, since October 2004. What is your discipline and country (or countries) of interest? I am a historian of modern China and Russia, with an interest in modern and pre-modern East Asian and World […]

Member Spotlight: Ekaterina Serbina

Ekaterina Serbina is a PhD student at the Institute of Far Eastern Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation, Moscow). She joined the AAS in February 2020. What is your discipline and country (or countries) of interest? My research field concerns Chinese “policy” banks—such as the Agricultural Development Bank of China, Export-Import Bank […]

AAS Statement on Fulbright Exchange Program

In response to Section 3 (i) of “The President’s Executive Order on Hong Kong Normalization,” issued by Donald Trump on July 14, 2020. AAS Board of DirectorsJuly 16, 2020 The executive order to end the Fulbright Exchange Program for China and Hong Kong is extremely short-sighted and will result in long-lasting implications for U.S. foreign […]

Excerpt: “The Board of Rites and the Making of Qing China”

Below, we are pleased to present an excerpt adapted from The Board of Rites and the Making of Qing China, written by Macabe Keliher and published by University of California Press. Keliher is assistant professor of history at Southern Methodist University; he has also written about law in Yuan China and how relatives threatened and […]

#AsiaNow Speaks with Charlene Makley

Charlene Makley is Professor of Anthropology at Reed College and author of The Battle for Fortune: State-Led Development, Personhood, and Power Among Tibetans in China (2018), published by Cornell University Press and Weatherhead East Asian Institute and Honorable Mention winner for the 2020 AAS E. Gene Smith Book Prize in Inner Asian Studies. Listen to […]

Counting and Controlling the Coronavirus

By Leksa Lee, NYU Shanghai On the morning of Thursday, February 13, the Chinese government raised the official number of confirmed coronavirus cases by a third in one day, to 60,000 (one week later, that number is now more than 74,000). Officially, the move reclassified thousands of “suspected” cases as “confirmed” using updated diagnosis criteria. […]

“Production, Circulation, and Accumulation”: Andrew Liu on the Historiographies of Capitalism in China and South Asia

This is Number 4 in the “JAS Author Interviews” series at #AsiaNow. Click here to see all posts in the series. Andrew B. Liu is Assistant Professor of History at Villanova University and author of “Production, Circulation, and Accumulation: The Historiographies of Capitalism in China and South Asia,” published in the November 2019 issue of […]

Railroads and the Transformation of China: A Q&A with Historian Elisabeth Köll

Foreign visitors to China today often remark with fascination and no small amount of wonder on the country’s extensive high-speed rail network. Constructed only in the last decade or so, the lines form a spider’s web across the map of China, stretching from the industrial northeast to Hong Kong in the south and westward to […]

Meet the JAS Editorial Assistants: A Discussion about Childhood Studies and Food Studies

Journal of Asian Studies editor Vinayak Chaturvedi works with an Editorial Assistant in the JAS office at the University of California, Irvine. Kyle David held this position during the 2018-19 academic year. He has recently stepped down, but remains with the JAS as Book Review Editor for the Transnational and Comparative Asia section. Clare Gordon […]

Ghost Plays, Socialist Modernity, and Cultural Politics in Twentieth-Century China

Ghost and goblins, spirits and specters … such supernatural beings manifest in stories told around the world, including many classics of the Chinese stage. Yet these spooky tales presented a problem for twentieth-century reformers, who struggled to reconcile their condemnation of “superstition” with the fact that some of the country’s best-known artistic works included superstitious […]

The Other Milk: A Q&A with Historian Jia-Chen Fu

In the 1980s, American children were subject to a deluge of advertising punctuated by the tagline “Milk: It Does a Body Good.” The campaign, funded by the dairy industry, encouraged kids to drink milk by emphasizing its contributions to physical development—the calcium and protein contained in the beverage, the ads stated, would help youths grow […]

Q&A with Jennifer Altehenger, Author of Legal Lessons

Jennifer Altehenger is Senior Lecturer in Contemporary Chinese History at King’s College London (Associate Professor in Chinese History at the University of Oxford from September 2019) and author of Legal Lessons: Popularizing Laws in the People’s Republic of China, 1949–1989 (Harvard University Asia Center, 2018). In Legal Lessons, Altehenger surveys how knowledge about the law […]

“The Invention of Madness”: A Q&A with Historian Emily Baum

When did “madness” become transformed into “mental illness”? How did this affect the treatment of those afflicted by such conditions? And how did it change the way those deemed mad—or mentally ill—were viewed by their families, as well as by the state, society, and medical professionals around them? Historian Emily Baum, associate professor at the […]

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