Education About Asia: Online Archives

Bringing Korea into the Curriculum: United States, World, and European History

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THE RATIONALE FOR A DBQ LESSON

Document-Based Essay (DBQ) questions teach students who are enrolled in Advanced Placement classes invaluable thinking and writing skills. Students learn to interpret primary source documents, critically examine different points of view, and deepen their understanding of textbooks and classroom discussions. Students in World, European, and United States History AP classes learn to combine outside information with the primary source material, an important step for writing research papers and college preparation. Traditionally the DBQ has been the preserve of gifted students. It is too valuable an instrument to be thus restricted because it offers opportunities for all students to participate in high-level critical thinking and writing exercises

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Blacker, Carmen. The Japanese Enlightenment: A Study of the Writings of Fukuzawa Yukichi. Cambridge: The University Press, 1969.

Ch’oe, Mun-hyong. Chegukchuui Sidae Ui Yolgang Kwa Hanguk, Vol. 37 and 65. Seoul: Minumsa Press, 1990.

Ferry, Jules. “Preface to Tonkin, 1890.” In Brian Tierney and Joan Scott, eds. Western Societies: A Documentary History, Vol. II. New York: McGraw Hill, Inc., 1984.

Lee, Ki-baik. A New History of Korea. Seoul, Ilchokak Publishers, 1984.

Lee, Peter H. ed. Sourcebook of Korean Civilization, Vol. II. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996.

USC-UCLA Joint East Asian Studies Center, “Treaty of Annexation,” http://www.isop.ucla.edu/eas/documents/kore1910.htm (cited June 26, 2002).