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Teaching Resources Essay

Mao and China in World History High School Textbooks

EDITOR'S NOTE We asked the author of this essay, as well as the one that follows, to read all references to Mao Zedong in two leading US high school World History textbooks, and provide commentary on the treatments of this important twentieth-century figure.

Teaching Resources Essay

Mao and China in World History High School Textbooks

A picture is worth a thousand words, as the old saying goes. In two recent high school world history textbooks, Mao's picture appears in tellingly different ways. In World History: Connections to Today (Prentice Hall, 2003), Mao appears well into the section on China in "Nationalism and Revolution Around the World ( 1910- 1939).'' It is a photo of a distinctly older Mao from the 1970s (I suspect from the time of Nixon's visit in 1972). It appears in a box on page 863 that reviews Mao's call to "...

Essay, Resources

Four Ways to Use Literature in Chinese History Courses

As teachers of Asian Studies courses, we have no doubt all used literature to help make our topic more accessible, challenging, and meaningful to our students. Over the years, I have come to use literature in four different ways in my Asian history and culture courses at Colorado College, a liberal arts college with small classes that promote discussion. I use literature as illustrative material, as confounding examples, as historical documents, and as liminal artifacts on the border between lit...