Northeast Asia Council Distinguished Speakers Bureau

Call for Nominations: NEAC Distinguished Speakers Bureau

The NEAC Distinguished Speakers Bureau is now seeking nominations and self-nominations for the 2021-24 cohort of DSB members. All materials are due by September 30, 2020. Please see the Call for Nominations for more details.

*Until the COVID-19 pandemic is brought under control and campus visits are allowed, the invited speaker gives lectures online and engages with students and the host faculty virtually. Thus, host institutions do not incur airfare and local expenses; however, NEAC will continue to provide the speaker’s honorarium. This situation will be updated as the COVID-19 restrictions are lifted.

*In response to the larger national and international discussions regarding race and racism, NEAC has expanded the topics of the Distinguished Speakers Bureau and included three new speakers. This newly added cohort of DSB speakers are those whose research concerns issues of race and racism in Japanese and Korean studies and those who can speak to the Asian American experience in the United States. These new speakers are listed in the Distinguished Speakers lists on our website (please see here for Japanese studies speakers and here for Korean studies). Institutions are welcome to apply to invite one of the expanded list of speakers to visit their campus through the same process as that on the website. During the current pandemic this will be in a virtual setting, with a variety of options, including a synchronous presentation followed by a Q&A, or a recorded presentation to be viewed at the convenience of the institution, followed by a Q&A with a particular class or a wider audience.

Note on Virtual Visits

Due to complications related to the COVID-19 health crisis, campus visits will be virtual until further notice. Please note that the list of speakers includes a preference from the speakers regarding the nature of their visit: via live interactions through the host institution’s digital platform (Zoom, Webex, or other similar platform), pre-recorded only, or a mixture of both.

Security of student and faculty data has become a concern as we increasingly live our lives and work on digital platforms. AAS recently released a statement on online scholarship, safety, and academic freedom and, in alignment with that statement, request all participating institutions comply with the following:

  • Live lectures and classroom visits must not be recorded.
    • Institutions must sign a waiver indicating that they understand this commitment to not record the web event.
  • Some lecturers have indicated pre-recorded lectures as a preference. If an institution chooses to invite a lecturer who has indicated this preference, please note the following:
    • Institutions must provide a waiver that the speaker will sign indicating the use of the recording and the length of time the recording will be kept.
    • The host institution does not have the right to reproduce, transcribe, edit, or distribute the content of pre-recorded lectures.
    • The host institution must agree to a time limit on the storage of the recorded lecture.

The Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies (NEAC) solicits applications from American colleges and universities (for Japanese studies) and any U.S. and Canadian colleges and universities (for Korean studies), especially those without well-established programs on East Asia, to invite a distinguished scholar to give a public lecture on their campus virtually, followed by a virtual Q&A with teachers and students.

The NEAC Distinguished Speakers Bureau began in 2011 and is supported by funds generously provided by the Japan-United States Friendship Commission (JUSFC) and the Korea Foundation (KF).

Colleges and universities may apply to host one of the distinguished scholars of Japan or Korea on the NEAC Distinguished Speakers Bureau. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, these visits will be hosted virtually until further notice. The invited speakers are expected to give one formal, public lecture (chosen from the list below) virtually, as well as meet virtually with classes. NEAC grant monies fund the honorarium for the NEAC Distinguished Speaker, which is set at $500.

NOTE: NEAC DSB speaking engagements and the application process must be initiated by the host university; applications seeking additional funding for already committed speaking engagements will not be considered.

Eligibility and Application Information

NEAC Distinguished Speakers may be hosted only at colleges and universities, including community colleges. Speakers on Japan will only be supported at institutions in the United States; speakers on Korea will be supported at institutions in the United States and Canada. The NEAC Distinguished Speakers Bureau is intended to serve institutions with small East Asian studies programs, not institutions with large and well-established centers in Japanese or Korean studies.

Due to the popularity of this grant program and the limited grant funds available, institutions may only receive support for one NEAC Distinguished Speakers Bureau program every three years. In addition, a limit has been set on the amount of DSB grant budget funds available to award in each six-month calendar year period so as to ensure that funds are available throughout the duration of our AAS/NEAC 3-year grants with the JUSFC and KF.

NEAC DSB grant applications are considered on a rolling basis. When funds expire for each six-month budgetary period, no further applications will be considered until the next budget period.

Please check back here before submitting your completed NEAC DSB application materials to determine if funding is available. We will post notices whenever funds are fully expended and alert you as to the exact date when applications will again be accepted.

Availability of Funds

Currently funds are available for any applications received during the July 1, 2020 – December 31, 2020 award period for a NEAC JAPAN DSB speaker grant.

Currently funds are available for any applications received during the July 1, 2020 – December 31, 2020 award period for a NEAC KOREA DSB speaker grant.

NEAC Distinguished Speaker grant applications may be submitted by individual faculty or staff members, but must be accompanied by a support letter from an administrator (department chair, center director, dean, etc.) confirming the institutional commitment to hosting the NEAC Distinguished Speaker and bearing all the local costs of their visit. Applications from students or student groups will not be accepted.

All publicity for the visit of a NEAC Distinguished Speaker must acknowledge the support of the Distinguished Speakers Bureau of the Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies and the respective grant funding agency (JUSFC for Japan speakers; KF for Korea speakers).

A NEAC Distinguished Speaker must present one virtual formal, public lecture (chosen from the list below; either synchronous or recorded) as well as meet with at least one class (undergraduate or graduate) for a virtual synchronous session. The honorarium for a NEAC Distinguished Speaker presenting one virtual public lecture and synchronous session with classes is $500.

Applications for the NEAC Distinguished Speakers Bureau are accepted on a rolling basis in order to allow the most flexibility in scheduling speaking engagements. Applications are only accepted in digital form (via Word or PDF attachment). Complete applications must be submitted at least 4 weeks prior to the anticipated visit of the NEAC Distinguished Speaker.

Host institutions are asked to provide an evaluation of the events featuring the NEAC Distinguished Speaker within 60 days following the speaker’s virtual campus visit (via a short narrative NEAC grant report form).

All views and opinions expressed by a NEAC Distinguished Speaker are the speaker’s alone and do not represent those of the Northeast Asia Council or the Association for Asian Studies.

How to Apply

(1) Look through:

(i) the Thematic Listing of Presentations in Japan and Korean Studies (below); and

(ii) the Lecturers and Presentations linked at the buttons above, and identify a scholar you would like to host at your institution. Please pay particular attention to the number of speaking engagements currently available for your desired speaker in each NEAC DSB term year. Some speakers have no limitations listed. If a speaker’s annual limitation has been reached, no further applications for a speaking engagement planned during that particular NEAC DSB term year will be considered.

(2) Verify that funds currently exist for awarding a DSB grant at this time by looking at the notice box above and by checking again immediately prior to submitting your DSB application, as the grant funding situation is fluid and can change quickly. If you submit an application and funds are currently fully expended for this six month DSB funding round, we will ask you to kindly resubmit your application after the start of the next 6-month funding cycle. In order to be equitable to all applicants, we cannot hold applications in queue.

(3) Contact the scholar directly to determine his/her interest and availability to visit your campus. Agree on tentative dates for the virtual visit.

(4) Complete the NEAC Distinguished Speaker Grant Application Form and submit electronically to Alicia Williams, AAS CFO awilliams@asianstudies.org at least four weeks prior to the anticipated visit of the NEAC Distinguished Speaker.

Be sure to include a letter from an administrator (department chair, center director, dean, etc.; the signatory cannot be the grant applicant) confirming the institutional commitment to hosting the NEAC Distinguished Speaker and bearing any local costs and a signed Distinguished Speakers Bureau Waiver on Recording Live Events Form, as well as proof of the speaker’s acceptance of the proposed speaking engagement (PDF of an e-mail communication, e.g.).

(5) Due to the popularity of this grant program and the limited grant funds available, institutions may only receive support for one NEAC Distinguished Speakers Bureau program every three years.

(6) Do not begin publicity for the NEAC Distinguished Speaker’s visit until you have been notified of the success of your application by the AAS Secretariat. NEAC Distinguished Speaker grant application award notification should be received within two weeks, barring any unforeseen circumstances or long holiday periods.

(7) Within 60 days following the speaking engagement, the host institution will submit all requisite reporting and publicity materials to Alicia Williams, awilliams@asianstudies.org.

For questions regarding the NEAC Distinguished Speakers Bureau, please contact Alicia Williams at awilliams@asianstudies.org.

Thematic Listing of Presentations (Japan)
Literature, Art, and Culture

Christopher L. Hill
Remembering Japan’s Modernization: Natsume Sôseki’s Kokoro
Japan in a Mirror: Kawabata Yasunari’s Snow Country
The Frayed Web: Takahashi Takako’s Lonely Woman

Laura Miller (DSB participation paused during the 2020-21 academic year)
Beyond Cute: The Serious Work of Kawaii in Contemporary Japan
Historically Hot: Reimagining Beauty from Japan’s Past
Reinventing Himiko: Japan’s Ancient Queen Rules the Twenty-First Century

Satoko Shimazaki (DSB participation paused during the 2020-21 academic year)
Going to the Theater in Early Modern Japan: Kabuki on Stage and in Print
Stage Body, Stage Gender: Kabuki Actors and Print Identity in Early Modern Japan
Making Voices, Creating Silence: Woodblock Print as Auditory Technology

William Tsutsui
Godzilla and Japan: Hiroshima, Fukushima, COVID-19
Tokyo 1940, 1964, 2021: Empire, Euphoria, and Pandemic in Japan’s Olympic History
Dreading and Dreaming Disaster: Japan’s Apocalyptic Imagination from Hiroshima to Fukushima

History

Sabine Frühstück
A Global History of Sexuality and Sexual Violence During World War II
“Real Men Die Wrapped in Horsehide:” and Other Tales of Modern Masculinity
Playing War: Children and the Paradoxes of Modern Militarism in Japan

Amy Stanley
Stranger in the Shogun’s City: A Japanese Woman and Her Worlds
After #MeToo: Rewriting the History of Sexual Assault
Urban History as Global History: The View from Edo, the Greatest City in the World

William Tsutsui
Godzilla and Japan: Hiroshima, Fukushima, COVID-19
Tokyo 1940, 1964, 2021: Empire, Euphoria, and Pandemic in Japan’s Olympic History
Dreading and Dreaming Disaster: Japan’s Apocalyptic Imagination from Hiroshima to Fukushima

Religions and Philosophies

Richard Jaffe
Japanese Buddhism’s Western Turn: Japan-South Asia Exchange and the Creation of Modern Japanese Buddhism
D.T. Suzuki, American Philanthropy, and the Globalization of Zen in the Twentieth Century
D.T. Suzuki’s 1952 Columbia University Zen Lectures and the New York Intelligensia

Jin Y. Park
Philosophizing and Power: East-West Encounter in the Formation of Buddhist Philosophy in Modern Korea and Japan

Politics and Society

Patricia L. Maclachlan
Reinventing the Post Office in Japan and the United States
Japan’s Changing Agricultural Landscape
Prime Ministerial Leadership in Contemporary Japan: The Case of Agricultural Reform

Amy Stanley
After #MeToo: Rewriting the History of Sexual Assault

Japan in Global Context

Jinsoo An
The Question of “Japan” in South Korean Cinema

Alexis Dudden
Above and Below the Waterline: The East China Sea in Japan’s Modern History
A Sea with No Name: The Troubled Waters of East Asia
Korea and a Divided Japan

Amy Stanley
Urban History as Global History: The View from Edo, the Greatest City in the World

Race and (Anti-)Racism in Japan

Michael Sharpe
Calling the Nation Home and Contesting National Membership: The Political Incorporation of Latin American Nikkeijin (Japanese Descendants) in Japan 1990-2008
Is Japan Becoming a Country of Immigration?: Litmus Test for Liberal Democracy
The Myth of Homogeneity and the Realities of Racism in Japan

Thematic Listing of Presentations (Korea)
Modern Korean Culture

Jinsoo An
Stupendous Villainy in Recent Korean Popular Films
South Korean Cinema under Authoritarianism
The Question of “Japan” in South Korean Cinema

Kyung Hyun Kim
Becoming-Black: Korean Hip-Hop at the Age of Hallyu
Post-Trauma, Korean War, and Cinema
Samsung Electronics and K-Pop

Suk-Young Kim
What Is K-Pop?
Hallyu (Korean Cultural Wave) and the Globalization of Korean Media
What Not to Wear: Women’s Fashion and Body Politics in North Korea

Religions and Philosophies

Juhn Ahn
Lost Graves and Recycled Mourning Sheds: How the Late Koryŏ Elite Took the Drama out of Afterlife
King Sejong the Great and the Cultural History of Weather, Religion, and Wealth in Early Chosŏn Korea

Jin Y. Park
Women and Buddhism: The Case of Kim Iryop
State Violence and Buddhist Social Engagement
Repertoires of Practices: Religions in Korea
Philosophizing and Power: East-West Encounter in the Formation of Buddhist Philosophy in Modern Korea and Japan

History

Juhn Ahn
Lost Graves and Recycled Mourning Sheds: How the Late Koryŏ Elite Took the Drama out of Afterlife
King Sejong the Great and the Cultural History of Weather, Religion, and Wealth in Early Chosŏn Korea
The Hidden Door, the Unclimbable Stairs, and the Broken Lightbulb: A Cultural History of the City in Korea

Sun Joo Kim
Regionality and Memory in History: Heroification of Kim Kyŏngsŏ
My Own Flesh and Blood: Contention over Paternal Love and Material Greed in Korean Slavery
Gravesite Litigation and Violence in Late Chosŏn Korea
Popular Protests in Korean History

Mitchell Lerner
Understanding North Korea
The Second Korean War

Literature

Dafna Zur
The Story of Data: Science and Fiction in North and South Korea
Anne Frank in North Korea and the Politics of Self-Writing
Music and Children’s Poetry in Early Modern Korea

Korea in Global Context

Jinsoo An
The Question of “Japan” in South Korean Cinema

Alexis Dudden
Korea and a Divided Japan
A Sea with No Name: The Troubled Waters of East Asia

Mitchell Lerner
The Korean War and the American Civil Rights Movement

Jin Y. Park
Philosophizing and Power: East-West Encounter in the Formation of Buddhist Philosophy in Modern Korea and Japan

Dafna Zur
Anne Frank in North Korea and the Politics of Self-Writing

Race, Gender, and Politics in Korea

Ji-Hyun Ahn
Watching Race: Mixed-Race Koreans and Multiculturalism in Contemporary South Korean TV
Anti-Korean Sentiment and (Online) Hate Culture in East Asia
What does the “K” Stand for in K-pop?: Deconstructing Koreanness in K-pop

Ju Hui Judy Han
Not Now, Not Yet: the Politics of Postponement and LGBTQ+ Activism in Korea
Beyond Mass Rallies and Candlelight Protests: Protest Repertoires in Precarious Times
The Queer Thresholds of Heresy
A Contentious History of Feminisms in Korea

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