Results for category: Field Notes

Embracing the Rebirth of Japanese Studies

By Paula R. Curtis Is Japanese Studies facing a crisis? There have been energetic discussions about the current status and future of Japanese Studies, amplified in no small part by the roundtable “The Death of Japan Studies” at the 2019 Association for Asian Studies conference in Denver. Speakers considered various influences on the field, from […]

Finding the Taejon Massacre in Independence, Missouri

By Sandra H. Park At the Truman Library last April, I learned of a vast photograph collection donated by the local Center for the Study of the Korean War (CSKW) before its closing. The archivists were still processing this collection, and the photographs I handled featured mostly commemorative or touristic scenes. These were all originally […]

Counting and Controlling the Coronavirus

By Leksa Lee, NYU Shanghai On the morning of Thursday, February 13, the Chinese government raised the official number of confirmed coronavirus cases by a third in one day, to 60,000 (one week later, that number is now more than 74,000). Officially, the move reclassified thousands of “suspected” cases as “confirmed” using updated diagnosis criteria. […]

Rethinking India’s Eighteenth Century, from the Perspective of Twentieth-Century Japan

By Weijia Vicky Shen, University of Pittsburgh On November 8, 2019, I attended the “Rethinking India’s Eighteenth Century” workshop at the University of Pittsburgh. The day-long gathering began with me sitting uncomfortably at a round table in the Humanities Center, surrounded by established scholars of South Asia. My anxiety stemmed in part from being the […]

Growing Rhythm

By Lauren Meeker, SUNY New Paltz In conjunction with the 2019 New York Conference on Asian Studies (NYCAS) on October 4-5, SUNY New Paltz hosted a series of workshops on Burmese music with funding from an AAS Council of Conferences (COC) Outreach Grant. The workshops brought together community members with New Paltz students and faculty […]

The Anti-Extradition Bill Protests and the Democracy Movement in Hong Kong

By Francis L.F. Lee Hong Kong experienced a very special June. The weather was as hot as usual, but the social atmosphere was even hotter. Three large-scale demonstrations and a series of more or less conflictual protests forced the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) government to “suspend” a highly controversial extradition bill. The bill […]

Japan’s Liberal-Democratic Paradox of Refugee Admission: A Q&A with Konrad Kalicki

This is Number 2 in the “JAS Author Interviews” series at #AsiaNow. Click here to see all posts in the series. Konrad Kalicki is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Japanese Studies and Department of Political Science at the National University of Singapore. He is author of “Japan’s Liberal-Democratic Paradox of Refugee Admission,” which […]

The AAS Secretariat is closed on Friday, July 3, 2020 in observance of the Fourth of July holiday.