AsiaNow

Found in Translation

“A Form of Prophecy for the Near Future”: Chinese Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century and Beyond

By Jing Jiang Jing Jiang is Associate Professor of Chinese and Humanities at Reed College and author of Found in Translation: “New People” in Twentieth-Century Chinese Science Fiction, the latest Asia Shorts title released by AAS Publications. Chinese science fiction (SF) has flourished in the last ten years. Writers who had been toiling quietly in […]

AAS Statement on Proposed Demolition of the Annex of the National Archives in Delhi

May 28, 2021Issued by the AAS Board of Directors AAS expresses grave concern at the recent announcement regarding the demolition of the Annex of the National Archives in Delhi. We urge the Government of India to disclose its plans for safely transferring held documents and artifacts, their intermediate and long-term storage, and their availability to […]

Michael O’Sullivan on Vernacular Capitalism and Intellectual History

Michael O’Sullivan is a Junior Research Fellow in the Center for History and Economics at Harvard University and author of “Vernacular Capitalism and Intellectual History in a Gujarati Account of China, 1860–68,” which appears in the May 2021 issue of the Journal of Asian Studies. O’Sullivan’s article discusses a travelogue published in 1868 by Damodar […]

The Fifty Years That Changed Chinese Religion

#AsiaNow Speaks with Paul R. Katz and Vincent Goossaert

AAS Publications has recently released the latest title in its Asia Past & Present monograph series. In The Fifty Years That Changed Chinese Religion, 1898–1948, Paul R. Katz (Academia Sinica) and Vincent Goossaert (EPHE, PSL [Paris]) examine a time of significant political and social upheaval in China and demonstrate how religious life was also transformed […]

In Memoriam: Kenneth Kazuo Tanaka (1935–2021)

Kenneth Kazuo Tanaka was born on February 10, 1935 in the small town of Kasumi on the northern coast of Hyogo Prefecture. He was the eldest son and one of six children born to Kyozen and Kinue Tanaka. His father was a Buddhist minister at the Gangyouji JodoShu Temple. Although Kenneth was to be a […]

Call for Papers: “Who is the Asianist?” The Politics of Representation in Asian Studies

The Black Lives Matter movement and the killing of George Floyd in May 2020 by Derek Chauvin of the Minneapolis Police Department have been cause for international reflection about the marginalization of Black people in multiple sectors of American and other societies. Within the U.S. academy, it has animated a discussion about the experiences of […]

Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month: Erased No Longer

Since 1992, May has been officially celebrated as Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month in the United States, and with good cause. The choice of May reflects two historic events: 1) the arrival of the first known Japanese immigrant to the United States on May 7, 1843; and 2) the completion of the First […]

Cover of Macabe Keliher, The Board of Rites and the Making of Qing China

#AsiaNow Speaks with Macabe Keliher

Macabe Keliher is Assistant Professor in the Clements Department of History at Southern Methodist University and author of The Board of Rites and the Making of Qing China, published by University of California Press, which won the 2021 AAS Joseph Levenson Pre-1900 Book Prize honorable mention. To begin with, please tell us what your book […]

AAS Statement on Academic Freedom in Thailand

Download PDF of statement in Thai Issued by the AAS Board of DirectorsApril 7, 2021 The Association for Asian Studies (AAS) is deeply concerned by growing intellectual repression in Thailand. Since the 2014 military coup d’etat, the country has seen an increasing number of attacks on academic freedom. Defamation lawsuits and the selective interpretation and […]

In Memoriam: Ezra F. Vogel

Ezra F. Vogel (1930–2020) was a lifetime member of the Association for Asian Studies. This small band of colleagues and friends were assembled from the late 1960s, under Ezra Vogel’s direction and encouragement, to support each other as we moved through our graduate student life passages. Ezra (and yes, he insisted on being called “Ezra”) […]