AsiaNow

Theodore C. Bestor, 1951-2021

We note with great sadness the passing of Professor Theodore Bestor on July 1, following a long battle with cancer. Professor Bestor was the Reischauer Institute Professor of Social Anthropology and Japanese Studies at Harvard, having previously taught at Columbia University (1986-1993) and Cornell University (1993-2001). He served as Chair of the Department of Anthropology […]

Member Spotlight: Tom Le

Tom Le is Assistant Professor of Politics at Pomona College and has been a member of the AAS since 2015. A political scientist, Le’s work covers Japan and East Asia more broadly. Why did you join AAS and why would you recommend AAS to your colleagues? I joined AAS to engage with scholars outside of […]

The Environments of East Asia: All About This New Open-Access Book Series

The Henry Luce Foundation has recently awarded Professors Albert L. Park (Claremont McKenna College) and Ann Sherif (Oberlin College) a $240,000 grant to establish an open-access book series, The Environments of East Asia, with Cornell University Press. This award builds on a previous Luce grant that funded EnviroLab Asia, an initiative Park participated in at […]

Call for Applications: AAS Membership Manager

AAS Membership ManagerAnn Arbor, MI The Association for Asian Studies (AAS) is a global non-profit academic association.  We are dedicated to the advancement of the field of Asian Studies through international exchange, networking, publications, research support, and career development.  The Membership Manager’s primary role is the management and administration of all aspects of member relations. This […]

Bar chart of PhDs in premodern Japanese history granted by gender, 1946-2026

Surveying Premodern Historians of Japan: Past, Present, and Future Directions of the Field

By Paula R. Curtis Since at least the 2008 economic collapse, scholars of all academic disciplines have been anxious about what the future holds for their fields of study. Even before the global pandemic of 2020-2021 exacerbated those concerns, large organizations like the American Historical Association showcased alarming data on the precipitous decline in academic […]

Found in Translation

“A Form of Prophecy for the Near Future”: Chinese Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century and Beyond

By Jing Jiang Jing Jiang is Associate Professor of Chinese and Humanities at Reed College and author of Found in Translation: “New People” in Twentieth-Century Chinese Science Fiction, the latest Asia Shorts title released by AAS Publications. Chinese science fiction (SF) has flourished in the last ten years. Writers who had been toiling quietly in […]

AAS Statement on Proposed Demolition of the Annex of the National Archives in Delhi

May 28, 2021Issued by the AAS Board of Directors AAS expresses grave concern at the recent announcement regarding the demolition of the Annex of the National Archives in Delhi. We urge the Government of India to disclose its plans for safely transferring held documents and artifacts, their intermediate and long-term storage, and their availability to […]

Michael O’Sullivan on Vernacular Capitalism and Intellectual History

Michael O’Sullivan is a Junior Research Fellow in the Center for History and Economics at Harvard University and author of “Vernacular Capitalism and Intellectual History in a Gujarati Account of China, 1860–68,” which appears in the May 2021 issue of the Journal of Asian Studies. O’Sullivan’s article discusses a travelogue published in 1868 by Damodar […]

The Fifty Years That Changed Chinese Religion

#AsiaNow Speaks with Paul R. Katz and Vincent Goossaert

AAS Publications has recently released the latest title in its Asia Past & Present monograph series. In The Fifty Years That Changed Chinese Religion, 1898–1948, Paul R. Katz (Academia Sinica) and Vincent Goossaert (EPHE, PSL [Paris]) examine a time of significant political and social upheaval in China and demonstrate how religious life was also transformed […]

In Memoriam: Kenneth Kazuo Tanaka (1935–2021)

Kenneth Kazuo Tanaka was born on February 10, 1935 in the small town of Kasumi on the northern coast of Hyogo Prefecture. He was the eldest son and one of six children born to Kyozen and Kinue Tanaka. His father was a Buddhist minister at the Gangyouji JodoShu Temple. Although Kenneth was to be a […]